The Tamron 150 – 600mm is a great telephoto-zoom lens that can capture a variety of shots. I I struggle with wildlife photos using my 70-300 VR lens. So you want to have a lens that can take a good photograph from a safe distance. The Coolpix P950 really does pack in a staggering 83x optical zoom lens that reaches an incredible 2000mm. I shoot lots of different wildlife with my 300f4 and 1.4 tc (420mm f5. A river otter enjoys a catfish among the cattails edging a lake in Central Oregon. The grip is deep and tall enough for my hands, none of my fingers feel cramped even after holding it for a few hours. So, should I go for the 500mm lens? question concerns my present predicament. If you like photographing birds then you may want to stretch out that longer length to 500mm or 600mm. ... Sony has increase the selection and there are now four specifically designed for wildlife: the FE 200-600mm f5.6-6.3 G, the 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 G Master, the 400mm f/2.8 G Master and the 600mm f4 G … the 600mm. 1. f/2.8. then the weight/size factor doesn't really exist for you. The camera bodies I had with me for the trip were the Canon 5D iii (Full Frame) and Canon 7D (Cropped Sensor), so it made the most sense for me to use the Sigma 150-600 on my cropped sensor, to get extra close to the animals. The Canon 600mm F/4L is commonly used for Sports/action, Wildlife photos and more. Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS III USM. All-in-one superzooms aren’t usually the first choice for wildlife, but they can be handy in situations where you need to travel light or don’t have time to change lenses. that teleconverters don't match the quality of a prime lens, so if you opt This is at full 600mm stopped down to f/8. It doesn't have quite the same reach as the Tamron 150-600mm lens, but it definitely can serve as an excellent sports and wildlife lens. Lets take a look at a 800mm photo of a 6 month old black bear cub: NIKON D4S @ 800mm, ISO 1100, 1/800, f/7.1 – Lens 800mm f/5.6E FL VR While the Nikon Prime is a fixed 600mm focal length, the Tamron zooms from 150-600mm, great for those opportunities when you unexpectly get very close to the wildlife, and you can quickly adjust and zoom back. MASSIVE thanks to Cameraland Cape Town for hooking me up with this lens, as well as the Olympus E-M5 mkii for this trip. Now having said that, if you are only going out with the sole intent of photographing It took long enough for me to get my hands on one, but I have finally had a chance to play around with Sigma's new 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Sport series lens, and man is it something special. had a Nikon 400 f2.8, it was so cumbersome that I never carried around with me; GARRY! For close-up portraits, Angela and Jonathan's lens of choice has been the Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM, now replaced in Canon's range by the updated Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS III USM. for the 400mm and plan to use it most of the time It’s never enough, in fact. Wild animals are notorious for not posing for a camera, even when asked very politely, so the enterprising wildlife photographer needs to be able to react quickly.This means that their camera needs to have a fast frame rate, to make sure they can capture … with me. ... Alaska, and while I haven’t tried either of these two lenses, I can tell you that for many instances, 400mm will be enough reach, but the 600mm would be handy. This is valid for many situations involving wildlife or bird photography. The Best Sony Full-Frame Wildlife Photography Lenses. Although it does not present a wide-angle option, these telephoto capabilities are ideal for wildlife photography, especially from a distance. For the professionals who … Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport review 10x superzoom beast of a lens offers ultimate versatility for shooting wildlife By Matthew Richards 31 October 2018 So, what is Third party lens makers Tamron and Sigma both have highly rated 150-600mm lenses. Sony FE 600mm f/4 GM OSS Lens. One of the most popular lenses, for both professionals and enthusiasts is a 70-200mm zoom. The exception is in places like Florida, where birds are tame enough to get within a few feet. If 400mm isn't quite enough to capture the action for your next wildlife adventure, there are very few excuses not to upgrade to the Canon 600mm f/4L IS II / Nikon 600mm f/4E FL ED AF-S VR. Right, so here’s what you clicked on my post to check out no doubt, so without any more babbling from me in this post, here are a bunch of photos I took while on Safari with the Sigma 150-600mm Sport Lens. Think about it for a second. Buy Rent 1. I use the Canon As for 400mm f/2.8 vs 500mm f/4, the 400mm will give you more options and working AF with all three teleconverters, while the 500mm has a weight/bulk advantage. Great Catch. In some national parks, regulations limit how close photographers can get to wildlife like bears and wolves. enough for you because you are doing a lot of low light photography, then Sony A7 III, A7R III, A9 Wildlife Photography: Drive Mode. If you usually photograph big animals like mammals or birds of prey, you may not need a super long lens. A 300mm f/2.8 + 2.0x is never comparable with 600mm lens. My next These are all “wildlife photography” situations, but they are obviously very different from each other. I am sponsored by Canon and am a Canon Ambassador, so I was fortunate enough to get to field test the R6 with the RF 600 and RF 800 telephotos for a day in mid-June 2020. Your email address will not be published. Yes, it is. If 600mm isn't enough for you, it can be paired with Canon's new 2X extender for RF to become a very portable (and very … This reach, of course, comes with a price: nearly $12,000 for the 600mm and $13,000 for the super-long 800mm glass. The Sony FE 600mm f/4 GM OSS Lens is one of the sharpest lenses I've ever used — the image quality it produces is outstanding. Price really isn't an issue. Unfortunately, birds are quite wary of humans, so getting close enough for a sharp shot with a 200mm lens be difficult for most species. It may fall a little short if you want a true bird lens. However, you have to consider that wildlife also tends to move. Sometimes I lust after the big glass 500mm+ f/4 lenses. The Ultimate Wildlife Photography Lens. Make sense. On the other hand if you have been using your 100-400mm zoom and I know that the 600mm lens is quite big and heavy, but the 400mm lens is Tamron’s ground-breaking 18-400mm is the longest lens of its type, giving an impressive 600mm equivalent range. | GALLERY | WORKSHOPS | ASK Sigma 150-600C Sharp Enough for Wildlife? Whoooooaa, what to do. wildlife, then you can afford to leave all of your other equipment behind, so I'm not sure which one to buy. But these suffer from optical quality and often lead to frustrating results. with teleconverters in order to get that extra reach, then you should really get Dan Carr on March 14, 2018 at 11:10 am . Yes indeed they are the best when we pay almost 8 times more than what you pay for Tamron 150-600mm. your opinion Garry? price. f/4 and the Canon 100-400mmL IS zoom matched with 1.4x and 2x teleconverters. That was why I chose the 150-600. If your goal is to capture animals in their natural environment, you will need a suitable lens to do the job. The Sigma 150-600mm Sport Lens is AMAZING for Wildlife & Bird Photography The bush is a fantastic place to switch off and connect with nature, especially if you love taking photos and you have a Sigma 150-600mm Sport Lens in your arsenal of photographic gear. Take this idea for granted. to the question of which lens would be better for you, the fast 400mm or the Having the ability to reach out across that 100-yard gap can be the difference between getting the shot and missing it. your choice should be the 400mm f2.8 The bush is a fantastic place to switch off and connect with nature, especially if you love taking photos and you have a Sigma 150-600mm Sport Lens in your arsenal of photographic gear. If you have your heart set on a 200mm lens for bird photography, consider a fixed “prime” telephoto lens such as the the Canon EF 200mm F/2.8L II USM . The 80-400mm is a great compact wildlife photography lens for travel. 70-200mm zoom. the same weight, just smaller. Best lens for wildlife portraits. For close-up portraits, Angela and Jonathan's lens of choice has been the Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM, now replaced in Canon's range by the updated Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS III USM. 3040g, the FE 600mm F4 GM OSS Manual focusing can be awkward on some ‘big’ lenses but was a breeze with this lens as the focus ring is well damped and smooth to operate. Canon 100-400L IS USM, 28-135 IS USM, 16-35L USM, 70-200L IS USM. Most of the time while I was shooting content in the bush though, I either had the lens on my Sirui Tripod or the Gimbal Tripod that was fixed to the game vehicle by request. Because of the long focal length, there's a large amount of perspective … I'll admit that i'm not camped out waiting for them, its far more opertunistic, if it wanders in front of me i'll have a go:) The latest attempt is blurry when blown up to a viewable size. They are light enough (around 2kg) to hand hold for short periods, have built in vibration reduction and come in just under £1,000. Part of that is that, in a lot of wildlife work, you can never have enough length – and this is the longest reasonable lens there is. And Canon 600mm F/4L is most used by customers who consider themselves to be a Photo enthusiast among others. As the name of the 300-600 suggests, it’s good for lenses sized from 300mm f/2.8 up to 600mm f/4, but it’ll also work with an 800mm f/5.6 or longer tele-zooms such as a Tamron 150-600mm, Nikon 200-500mm or Sigma 60-600mm. 300mm is too short for most wildlife, especially if it’s skittish. For shooting wildlife, my personal preference would be the Canon 500mmL IS f/4 and the Canon 100-400mmL IS zoom matched with 1.4x and 2x teleconverters. will be "shooting" wildlife such as wolves, foxes and birds. I love wildlife photography and my favourite lens is Olympus 300mm F/4.0. The Canon 600mm F/4L is commonly used for Sports/action, Wildlife photos and more. 5. Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 600mm f/4E FL ED VR Lens. EOS 3 and Canon Elan 7E. 6) on a nikon d500. If you ever had the R in your hands, it's basically the same body. Tamron also has an excellent 150-600mm lens which comes in at an astonishingly cheap price for a lens that will take you all the way to 600mm. If your wildlife photography is occurring in low light conditions, this may be the right lens for you. IMAGE QUALITY. And Canon 600mm F/4L is most used by customers who consider themselves to be a Photo enthusiast among others. longer and slower (it's not really slow) 600mm. That’s why it’s my favorite wildlife lens. ... plus rent a super-zoom strategy makes lots of sense for a ‘wanna-be but never gets enough time’ wildlife photographer. If your wildlife is in the forest or there are other line-of-sight obstructions, a 400mm lens may be a better choice than a 600mm … The key word is speed, and this manifests in a number of ways. The best lens for wildlife photography is a telephoto lens with zoom capabilities. If weight is not an issue, then there are some very good ‘super zoom’ lenses available, with a focal length of 150-600mm. Aug 10, 2017 3 Yes. Presenting the Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD, it is crucial to note that this is the lens with the biggest super zoom on this list. Impressive Performing Lens. This is a great lens for those that need enough specificity to capture great wildlife photos but also not so specific that it can’t snag other types of photos too. With the f/2.8 max aperture, this lens retains a reasonably wide aperture with extenders mounted. I've written you before and your advice has been very helpful. have found that the reach of the 400mm is adequate for you but it isn't fast This is a great lens for those that need enough specificity to capture great wildlife photos but also not so specific that it can’t snag other types of photos too. With APS-C DSLR Camera Body ... Shutter speed is selected in such a way that it is good enough to freeze the moment. The 400 and 600mm lenses are about the same Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window), Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window). It’s smaller, lighter, and less expensive than the Sports version, but it doesn’t look, feel, or perform like a budget lens. In this case, the Nikon 600mm f/4 is always going to be the top choice. And 300mm is definitely too short for most birds. For wildlife photography, the longer your lens, the closer you’ll be to the action. I found that using my Canon 400mm f/5.6 was strong enough for local wildlife and sports, but came up a bit short for serious bird photography. Here are my initial thoughts and ramblings based on my hands-on experience. HOME That is exactly why, even though I love my Canon 100-400mm L II, I decided to try out the Tamron 150-600mm G2. That’s not a typo. … The bush is a fantastic place to switch off and connect with nature, especially if you love taking photos and you have a Sigma 150-600mm Sport Lens in your arsenal of photographic gear. The Tamron 150 – 600mm is a great telephoto-zoom lens that can capture a variety of shots. Known as a dream lens for wildlife photographers, especially those who are into bird photography, the Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM Lens offers the best when it comes to sharpness and autofocus speed. Two of the super telephoto lenses I have are the 600mm f/4 prime and the 800mm f/5.6 prime and they are amazing lenses that give me amazing reach for wildlife, but this reach can also be a problem when multiple eyes are involved (ie: several animals in same frame). But only if you’re in the right location. So I got the teleconvertor and used it in my photo sessions for more than one year. It may fall a little short if you want a true bird lens. With the f/2.8 max aperture, this lens retains a reasonably wide aperture with extenders mounted. Wildlife Photography with Canon 500mm f4 L IS II Lens. I found that using my Canon 400mm f/5.6 was strong enough for local wildlife and sports, but came up a bit short for serious bird photography. It has a great long focal length, a great long focal length and focuses very fast. The Sigma 150-600mm Contemporary is one of a pair of lenses that covers the same focal range. Searching for a wildlife lens with more reach that won’t break the bank is a common quest for us bird and wildlife photographers. Updated on: July 6th, 2020. Now I'm sure that you know Sooner you accept better it is. A 300mm focal length can get you some gorgeous wildlife shots. If that's true, why is there a market for 400-600mm+ lenses? Telephoto zoom lenses are the best lenses for wildlife photography as they allow you to isolate details of the landscape, shoot from a long distance, and avoid disturbing the animals. Sharpness: I had heard this lens was quite sharp before purchasing it, but “sharp” is a moving standard. Never seen that from a $1,000 supertele before this lens. Notify me of follow-up comments by email. I had the 100-400mm and 200-600mm Sony lenses in direct succession, and I preferred the images from the less expensive 200-600mm almost every time. 800mm lenses exist, but … You’ll certainly have no problems even filling the frame with distant subjects, but if that’s still not enough then there’s the Nikon Coolpix P1000 with an 125x zoom that hits an eye-watering … 2. If your wildlife is in the forest or there are other line-of-sight obstructions, a 400mm lens may be a better choice than a 600mm lens. So the Sigma 150-600mm Sport Lens was essentially a 240-960mm lens, making it PERFECT for shooting wildlife. So even tough I often praise such lenses as the 600mm for wildlife, there are many challenges shooting multiple subjects with a 600mm or longer. BEST FOR: THE PHOTOGRAPHY SNIPER. This focal length range, extending out to 100mm available, is especially suitable for environmental portraits, and these images can sometimes be more compelling than a tight animal … to move up to a larger lens. lens and get a 1.4x extender too? It has a great long focal length, a great long focal length and focuses very fast. I would prefer the faster 400mm @ If you can cover focal lengths from about 20mm to 400mm you won’t miss out on much. The weight and the size of the 400mm and 600mm are their big disadvantages. The weight and the size of the 400mm and 600mm are their big disadvantages. I was lucky enough to have this lens on loan from the legends at Cameraland Cape Town for a recent trip I did to Sabi Sands where Carlinn and I stayed at Jacis Sabi House for 5 Days. Known as a dream lens for wildlife photographers, especially those who are into bird photography, the Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM Lens offers the best when it comes to sharpness and autofocus speed. This review is based on those field tests, which were more me taking the gear and using it in real wildlife photography situations than actually doing … I need The size of your typical subject will affect which lens you choose. Sigma categorises its latest lens line-up as either Art, Contemporary or Sports, which provides a clue to their respective intended use but is somewhat confusing when there are lenses offering identical fo… Now, please don’t jump on me immediately that the big boy primes are the best! Thanks in advance........ For shooting wildlife, my personal preference would be the Canon 500mmL IS Read on to find our wildlife photography review of the Sony 200-600mm lens, including sample raw files for you to download and check out. Coupled with the amazing glass inside this lens, it has a pretty remarkable stabilising system which allowed me to shoot super sharp hand held photos as well as relatively stable footage when I was shooting video. Then it comes down Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. On Tuesday, Sony announced two new 600mm lenses: a 600mm f/4 prime aimed at pro sports and wildlife photographers, and a much more affordable Sony 200-600mm f/5.6-6.3 which is certain to appeal to a much broader audience. As you can see, there’s more choice when you go into the zoom territory; aside from the classic 70-200mms, which may not be long enough for many wildlife photography situations, my choice would be the 200-600mm or the 100-400mm. You can read all about the Olympus E-M5 mkii here…, Your email address will not be published. The lens uses the 2 nd generation image stabilizer, and Canon has introduced the 3 rd image stabilize mode via this lens. I had the 100-400mm and 200-600mm Sony lenses in direct succession, and I preferred the images from the less expensive 200-600mm almost every time. TOP TIP: If you ever visit a Game Lodge and you don’t have a tripod or beanbag to rest your camera on, just ask the staff if they have any as you’ll find 9 out of 10 lodges will be able to assist. I'm looking at the EF 400mm f/2.8L IS USM, EF When using your Sony A7 III for birds in flight, you want to reduce the chance of missing a good moment, so taking pictures in continuous mode is a must. Wildlife photography is a genre that DSLR cameras have dominated for decades. Lenses like the Canon EF 800mm f/5.6L IS USM Super Telephoto Lens or the Nikon 600mm f/4.0G ED VR II AF-S SWM Super Telephoto Lens have the optical power to fill your frame with even distant wildlife, but the price tags keep lenses like this out of all but a select few professional wildlife shooter’s bags. All-in-one superzooms aren’t usually the first choice for wildlife, but they can be handy in situations where you need to travel light or don’t have time to change lenses. Here I shot this wide open at 600mm, and it's still respectably sharp. Often when starting out with wildlife photography, some people go for the longest superzoom they can find like the 150-600mm or 50-500mm. Their robust design and reliable autofocus system, in addition to the vast lens selection, are just a few of the many characteristics amateurs or experienced photographers require in order to capture animals in their natural habitat. Required fields are marked *. Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. The Fujifilm HX-1, introduced in 2018, was the first Fujifilm X Series model fast enough to make our list of cameras for wildlife photography. 500 f/4.0L IS USM, and EF 600 f/4.0L IS USM. It can shoot at speeds up to 14 fps with its electronic shutter, or 8 fps with its mechanical shutter. When Olympus announced the MC-20 teleconverter I was excited about the idea of having a 600mm combo. Maybe I should go for the smaller faster 400mm To capture this portrait from the opposite shore with the EOS 90D, Lepp used an EF 600mm f/4L IS III USM lens with an Extender EF 2x III (1200mm), achieving an angle of view of 1920mm with the 1.6x crop factor of the … 4 … 3 Di VC USD Telephoto Lens for an FE 200-600mm G OSS lens for wildlife and astrophotography with my Sony For most lenses, this camera feels very … Best Lens For Wild Life Photography. If you don’t know the difference between a Full Frame and Cropped sensor, you can watch a short video about that here…. 5. Sony has announced what I would consider their first true bird photography lens, the FE 600mm f/4 GM OSS. When photographing wildlife, I sometimes carry just a 100-400mm lens, and sometimes I take a 100-400mm lens to complement a 600mm f/4. I shoot a Canon EOS system. A 200-300mm lens might be enough … hence I never used it and of course missed plenty of shots by not having it In my opinion, if you are in the market for a versatile wildlife lens and are on a budget, the Tamron 150-600mm would be a very good choice. I go over how the Tamron SP 150-600mm G2 preforms for wildlife photography in real world settings, and show you my real world results. Best lens for wildlife portraits. Telephoto lenses can be heavy and often need to be mounted on a tripod in order to be used. Part of that is that, in a lot of wildlife work, you can never have enough length – and this is the longest reasonable lens there is. | BOOKS. If the wildlife is small and you can't get very close to it, then 100-400 may not be good enough for what you want it to do. Thanks! Designed as a lightweight and affordable extreme telephoto prime for Canon RF-mount shooters, the Canon RF 600mm F11 IS STM is a versatile lens for casual wildlife and general photography. Sometimes more reach would be nice but 400mm is a good length on a crop body especially for … I It doesn't have quite the same reach as the Tamron 150-600mm lens, but it definitely can serve as an excellent sports and wildlife lens. I use a tripod or a monopod to rest the camera on while I am not shooting to help deal with the weight. A long-reaching telephoto optimized for sports, wildlife, and nature shooting, the Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 600mm f/4E FL ED VR Lens features an advanced optical design that both lessens the overall weight of the lens as well as contributes to improved image quality. It’s usually a debate between using a 300mm f/2.8 with a teleconverter and buying a 500mm f/4, 600mm f/4, or 800mm f/5.6. is what I already have: Nearly all of my bird and wildlife photographs have been made on … On Tuesday, Sony announced two new 600mm lenses: a 600mm f/4 prime aimed at pro sports and wildlife photographers, and a much more affordable Sony 200-600mm f/5.6-6.3 which is certain to appeal to a much broader audience. For wildlife photography, lens options do not get better than this one. I was lucky enough to have this lens on loan from the legends at Cameraland Cape Town for a recent trip I did to Sabi Sands where Carlinn and I stayed at Jacis Sabi House for 5 Days. Size and weight is relative and some may feel that this lens is still a brute in this regard, but compared to a 500mm / 600mm f/4 or 400mm f/2.8 it’s much more manageable and easier to handle. I also have the Extender EF 2x II. Last year when I switched from my Canon 500mm f/4 lens to the Sony 200-600mm f/5.6-6.3, there was a little bit of hesitancy due to the difference in f-stop regarding my ability In a nutshell, you get more focal length out of a cropped sensor and with Canon specifically, the 7D has a 1.6 Crop. Tamron’s ground-breaking 18-400mm is the longest lens of its type, giving an impressive 600mm equivalent range. If your wildlife photography is occurring in low light conditions, this may be the right lens for you. 800mm lenses exist, but they’re either f11 or over $10,000. My question was if it is sharp enough to see all the individual hairs on feathers when I shoot birds. I’ve been pleased with the wildlife images I’ve captured with mine, and am looking forward to getting even better ones with practice. Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS III USM. There is wildlife that you can't get close to or it would be dangerous if you did. For most wildlife photography, I PREFER these light superzooms to those heavy 600s. In summary: if you need the reach, you get the 600mm f/4. The “plane” setting works well for birds as long as the background is clear enough (a blue sky for example). The range of 150-600mm is just fantastic that you can shoot wildlife portraits, habitat shots and birds. One of these is Sigma’s 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary (C) lens, a relatively new offering aimed at sports and wildlife photographers looking for a quality lens at a budget price. Reply. While a Canon 28-135mm lens might be long enough at the 135mm end to fill the frame with a bird a dozen feet away, it just doesn’t have the focal length to zoom in on a deer several hundred feet away. With each of these lenses offering around four stops of image stabilization and an f-stop range from f/4-32, there are plenty of reasons why the 600mm f/4 is considered the king of the super-telephotos. For example, the Olympus M.ZUIKO ED 300MM F4.0 IS PRO is equivalent to a 600mm prime on a full-frame camera—but at 3.7 inches in diameter, 8.9 inches in length and 2.8 pounds, this lens is just a little over half the size and more than 60 percent lighter than the AF-S NIKKOR 600mm f/4E FL ED VR (6.5-inch diameter, … The lens uses the 2 nd generation image stabilizer, and Canon has introduced the 3 rd image stabilize mode via this lens.